CO2 Connection Demolished… New Findings: “No Statistically Significant Trends In US Flooding And Rainfall From Tropical Storms!

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With the blaring headlines we saw in the wake of tropical storm Harvey over Houston last year and Florence over the Carolinas last month, the CO2 hysteria saw another severe flare up.

However, a scientific study recently published in the Journal of Hydrology analyzed North Atlantic tropical cyclones (TCs) and their contribution to flooding and rainfall across the US. Hat-tip: a reader.

The result?

No statistically significant trends in magnitude or frequency.

What follows is the paper’s abstract and main take-away points:

Adventurous scientific speculation

Also, leading Univ. of Alabama climate scientist Dr. Roy Spencer dismissed any claimed connection between climate change and Hurricane Florence.

On the alarmist claim that hurricanes are slowing down due to jet stream changes, which allegedly result from climate, warming, which allegedly result from a greenhouse effect by added CO2, Spencer dumps cold water on it and seems to characterize the attempt as adventurous speculation:

But like most claims regarding global warming, the real effect is small, probably temporary, and most likely due to natural weather patterns. Any changes in hurricanes over 70 years, even if real, can easily be part of natural cycles — or incomplete data. Coastal lake sediments along the Gulf of Mexico shoreline from 1,000 to 2,000 years ago suggest more frequent and intense hurricanes than occur today. Why? No one knows.”

 

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6 responses to “CO2 Connection Demolished… New Findings: “No Statistically Significant Trends In US Flooding And Rainfall From Tropical Storms!”

  1. sunsettommy

    Yeah the Atlantic Hurricane season was a slow one…., only ONE made landfall so far.

    Snicker…………

  2. Yonason

    In other news, the Sahara is still dry.

    P.S. – Where did everybody go?

  3. SebastianH

    Is there are reason for omitting a link to this paper in the article?

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022169418301549

  4. Don B

    After Houston was flooded by a stalled hurricane, false claims were made about how unprecedented it was. A Miami newspaper published some truths:

    “Cuba got hammered by more than 100 inches of rain when Hurricane Flora sat over the island for four days in 1963. And even earlier, in 1909 before hurricanes were named, a storm dropped more than 96 inches of rain on Jamaica. In more recent history, Wilma dumped more than 62 inches of rain on Mexico in 2005 and Hurricane Mitch, blamed for killing more than 11,000 in Central America in 1998, soaked Nicaragua with more than 62 inches, according to records compiled by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecaster David Roth.”

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/weather/hurricane/article170512137.html

  5. Don B

    No, Houston’s flooding caused by a stalled hurricane was not unprecedented:

    “Cuba got hammered by more than 100 inches of rain when Hurricane Flora sat over the island for four days in 1963. And even earlier, in 1909 before hurricanes were named, a storm dropped more than 96 inches of rain on Jamaica. In more recent history, Wilma dumped more than 62 inches of rain on Mexico in 2005 and Hurricane Mitch, blamed for killing more than 11,000 in Central America in 1998, soaked Nicaragua with more than 62 inches, according to records compiled by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecaster David Roth.”

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/weather/hurricane/article170512137.html

  6. Yonason

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