The Discovery Of Tree Trunks Under Glaciers 600 Meters Atop Today’s Treeline Date To The Last ICE AGE

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Tree Trunk Conundrum

Image Source: Ganyushkin et al., 2018

Between 60 and 40 thousand years ago, during the middle of the last glacial, atmospheric CO2 levels hovered around 200 ppm – half of today’s concentration.

Tree remains dated to this period have been discovered 600-700 meters atop the modern treeline in the Russian Altai mountains.  This suggests surface air temperatures were between 2°C and 3°C warmer than today during this glacial period.

Tree trunks dating to the Early Holocene (between 10.6 and 6.2 thousand years ago) have been found about 350 meters higher than the modern treeline edge.  This suggests summer temperatures were between 2°C and 2.5°C warmer than today during the Early Holocene, when CO2 concentrations ranged between about 250 and 270 ppm.

None of this paleoclimate treeline or temperature evidence correlates with a CO2-driven climate.


Ganyushkin et al., 2018     Full Paper

Samples of wood having an age of 10.6–6.2 cal ka BP were [the Early Holocene] found about 350 m higher than the present treeline. It seems that the summer temperature was 2.0–2.5 °C higher and annual precipitation was double that of the present-day.”
“Buried wood trunks by a glacier gave ages between 60 and 28 cal ka BP and were found 600–700 m higher than the present upper treeline. This evidences a distinctly elevated treeline during MIS 3a and c. With a correction for tectonics we reconstructed the summer warming to have been between 2.1 and 3.0 °C [higher than today].”

Image Source: Ganyushkin et al., 2018
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12 responses to “The Discovery Of Tree Trunks Under Glaciers 600 Meters Atop Today’s Treeline Date To The Last ICE AGE”

  1. Tree Stump Conundrum – CO2 is Life

    […] None of this paleoclimate treeline or temperature evidence correlates with a CO2-driven climate. (Source) […]

  2. John F. Hultquist

    If the idea of global warming was science,
    this single tree would negate the entire edifice.

    ~ ~ ~ ~
    The stem and main wooden axis of a tree is usually called the trunk or bole.

    1. Don Andersen
  3. Bitter&twisted

    Obviously fake news.
    Just like fossils were put in place, by the Devil, to deceive the faithful.
    PS
    Merry Xmas

  4. The Discovery Of Tree Trunks Under Glaciers 600 Meters Atop Today's Treeline Date To The Last ICE AGE | Un hobby...

    […] K. Richard, December 24, 2018 in […]

  5. Robert Folkerts

    Assuming all the assumptions that go with dating, multiple ice ages etc are correct. The correct explanation might differ somewhat. However the evidence clearly is that there is a tree that was under the ice.

  6. Lee Scott

    I suppose a Climate Scientologist would argue that the retreating glacier must have dragged the tree trunk with it from a much lower elevation as it retreated up the mountain. 🙂

    1. rah

      Yes! Everyone knows that there are terminal moraines left at the peaks of mountains due to glaciers receding and dying out! LOL!

  7. Glaciers | Pearltrees

    […] The Discovery Of Tree Trunks Under Glaciers 600 Meters Atop Today’s Treeline Date To The Last ICE …. By Kenneth Richard on 24. December 2018 Image Source: Ganyushkin et al., 2018 Between 60 and 40 thousand years ago, during the middle of the last glacial, atmospheric CO2 levels hovered around 200 ppm – half of today’s concentration. […]

  8. Dr Tim Ball - Historical Climatologist
  9. Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #342 | Watts Up With That?
  10. Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #342 - Sciencetells

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