Environmental Rape Of Africa: Hamburg Power Plants Aim To Deforest Namibia For Power Plant Fuel!

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Environmental rape in the name of climate protection.

To meet its CO2 reductions targets, Hamburg plans to deforest Africa in order to substitute coal with wood at its power plants!


Nambia’s bushwood may end up being burned in place of coal at Hamburg’s power plants – all in the European city’s plan to go green! Photo: Scott A. Christy (Heyheyuwb, CC-BY-2.5; Released under the GNU Free Documentation License; CC-BY-SA-3.0-MIGRATED, Wikimedia Commons.

Substituting coal with wood from Africa

German environmental protection group ROBIN WOOD here recently issued a press release calling on the city of Hamburg, Germany to cancel its plan to replace coal with imported bushwood from Namibia at its power plants, such as the Tiefstack cogeneration plant.

In May, 2020, a “Memorandum of Understanding” became known, according to which the Hamburg environmental authority (BUKEA) and Wärme Hamburg GmbH are examining a project of this kind.

ROBIN WOOD is firmly opposed to this project of a “Transcontinental Biomass Partnership Namibia – Hamburg”, which is being promoted by the German Association for International Cooperation (GIZ).

“Obliged” to pursue “socially just, climate-friendly” renewable energies

“With the referendum on the buyback of the energy networks, which was won in 2013, the Hamburg Senate was obliged to pursue the goal of a “socially just, climate-friendly and democratically controlled energy supply from renewable energies,” says the ROBIN WOOD press release. “The intended burning of bushwood from Namibia clearly contradicts this goal.”

Voters apparently were not well informed what meeting the climate-friendly” goals really entailed when they voted.

Namibia land use – to benefit crony euro-corporations

Because of the long transport distances and especially because of changes in land use in Namibia, this form of energy supply would not be climate-compatible. The German environmental group also claims “the main beneficiaries would be corporations in the global North, which would be able to sell machines and transport vehicles and supply themselves with raw materials.”

No transparency

ROBIN WOOD also accuses the green-socialist Hamburg Senate of avoiding an open-ended debate about the project and criticizes the lack of transparency and democratic control.

“We are calling for a climate-friendly, 100 percent renewable energy supply that does not require the neo-colonial import of resources from the global south,” says Ronja Heise, ROBIN WOOD energy consultant.

Namibia already lacking energy

“Namibia is itself in an energy crisis and is importing up to 60 percent dirty coal power from neighboring countries to cover its local energy needs. Instead of exporting biomass, Namibia should use it to produce electricity in its own country. Sustainable methods for bush clearance must be applied. Bushes are an important carbon sink. They must therefore only be harvested in a targeted manner, which cannot be guaranteed if very large quantities of wood are exported,” says Bertchen Kohrs, Director of the organization Earthlife Namibia.

Green-socialist Senate claims support for project

“The Hamburg Senate, in its response to a written petition, gave the impression that the NGOs whichoppose bushwood imports would have a similar number of supporters. This is wrong,” said Gilbert Siegler of the Hamburg Energy Table. “We invite other organizations to join the signatories in opposing the implementation of a ‘Biomass Partnership with Namibia’. This pretense of climate protection must be prevented.”

The signatories of the petition call on the Hamburg environmental authority to stop pursuing this project and to work towards an energy supply for Hamburg that is in line with the binding goals of the referendum.




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16 responses to “Environmental Rape Of Africa: Hamburg Power Plants Aim To Deforest Namibia For Power Plant Fuel!”

  1. Yonason

    Good forest management is essential to preventing forest fires.
    https://hotair.com/archives/ed-morrissey/2020/10/19/nbc-say-know-turned-right-forest-fires/

    But, while deforestation might accomplish that goal, it’s not exactly the optimal solution.

    Also, I don’t need to mention that burning wood pellets before they’re turned into coal is dirtier than burning coal, do I?
    https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2018/04/16/burning-green-pellets-is-filthier-than-using-coal/

    Note that one excuse for this is “peak oil,” but while that endpoint is in the increasingly distant future, “peak biomass” would be like tomorrow by comparison.

    And, speaking of “good forest management,” what we need for that to be put into effect is “good leadership management,” where we clean out the deadwood in that overcrowded ideological tinderbox.

    1. Aussie

      Well said, particularly the last paragraph

      1. Yonason

        Thanks, Aussie!

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    […] Environmental Rape Of Africa: Hamburg Power Plants Aim To Deforest Namibia For Power Plant Fuel! […]

  3. The Indomitable Snowman, Ph.D.

    Having repeatedly seen firsthand what China has been doing in/to Africa, I guess the Euros now want a piece of the action…

    BTW, Namibia is one of the largest uranium producers in the world. How about helping them to use *that* (shudder!) for energy production? (Africa was already in many places deforested for “biomass energy.” Apparently the Euros can’t do math.)

  4. drumphish

    The vast frontiers of Russia would have plenty of forest biomass.

    Why not use those forests as a biomass source?

  5. Eco-Rape Of Africa: Hamburg Power Plants To Use Namibia Bush Wood For Fuel | NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

    […] Full story here. […]

  6. Eco-Rape Of Africa: Hamburg Power Plants To Use Namibia Bush Wood For Fuel | | Climate- Science.press

    […] Full story here. […]

  7. bonbon

    Husab Uranium Mine in Namibia set to break production records
    WINDHOEK Namibia (Xinhua) — China’s biggest single investment in Africa—the Husab Uranium Mine in Namibia that is worth two billion U.S. dollars—is on course to start operations by the end of this year.
    http://www.coastweek.com/3925-Chinese-companies-create-6000-jobs-in-Namibia-ambassador.htm

    Uranium in Namibia
    https://www.world-nuclear.org/information-library/country-profiles/countries-g-n/namibia.aspx

    So instead of buying Uranium, it sure looks like a deal was made for biomass.

    1. Yonason

      Anybody else have a bad feeling about this?

  8. Gustav

    Need wood to burn? Just import coal from Poland. It’s processed wood, basically. Excellent fuel too, with the highest EROEI but for hydro and recycled nuclear.

    1. bonbon

      Poland just signed a massive nuclear power deal with the US. So they just might have soon more coal for sale.

  9. pochas94

    Burning wood generates CO2 that grows more trees that replace the ones you cut down, isn’t that it? But doesn’t burning coal grow more trees automatically?

  10. BURNING THE FORESTS TO SAVE THE PLANET | | Climate- Science.press

    […] Environmental Rape Of Africa: Hamburg Power Plants Aim To Deforest Namibia For Power Plant Fuel! […]

  11. Brian James

    Jul 28, 2020 Africa’s Choice: Africa’s Green Revolution has Failed, Time to Change Course

    Global philanthropies, newly endowed with billions of dollars in technology profits, led the charge. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation established a well-funded program on international development and partnered with the Rockefeller Foundation in 2006 to launch the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA).

    https://www.iatp.org/africas-choice

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