Der Spiegel Warned Of Warming In 1948, Then Cooling In 1974, And Again Warming In 1986!

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Jeez…can’t these guys make up their minds!

Here’s Der Spiegel writing about global warming in 1948, just 26 years before it warned the planet was cooling (1974), read that here, which was only 12 years before they again warned of warming (1986), read it here!

The 1948 piece is titled: It’s getting warmer on the planet. Below are a few of the excerpts. See if it all sounds familiar to you.

First Der Spiegel starts by telling us that “the Governor of California has declared an emergency in 28 counties of his state” and that the current drought there is “likely the most extreme in the last 500 years.”

Weather extremes, and Spitzbergen 7°C above normal

Back in 1948 Spiegel authors wrote of “unusual weather over the past year in Central Europe” and fears that “the climate of the old continent will not remain the same.”

And what would climate predictions be without a consensus of scientists? Der Spiegel wrote:

The scientists say: What is certain is that we now find ourselves in the middle of a large climate change. And it is the biggest in many parts of the world. Not only an increase in air temperatures, but also an increase in water surface temperatures in the oceans.

The most plain to see is the warming in the northern polar regions. Winter temperatures at Spitzbergen during the 1930/39 decade were 7°C over the 1926 measured mean.”

I don’t have my PDO and AMO chart here at my fingertips, but weren’t they at about their positive peaks back then?

Melting Arctic

There was also plenty of Arctic melting going on back then too, just like today! Der Spiegel wrote:

The “Northeast Passage” (the seaway north of Siberia) is like the “Northwest Passage” around Canada, which were earlier virtually impassible, have since become much easier. Amundsen needed 3 years to get through the Northwest passage at the start of this century. In autumn of last year, Canadian Larsen needed less than three months to overcome it. And Larsen had none of the impassable ice that Amundsen had to deal with.

“Catastrophic consequences” wrote Der Spiegel:

The polar climate improvement and the appearance of warmer waters in the northern seas are causing profound changes in plant and animal life.

The glaciers in Greenland, Spitzbergen and Nowaja Semlja, as well as the ones in the European mountains, have been retreating considerably for quite some time now. The complete melting of all glaciers would have catastrophic consequences: sea levels would rise about 55 meters.”

Warming causes both mild and cold winters, just like today! Der Spiegel wrote in 1948:

Warming has led to increased meteorological unrest. That means a tendency for more extreme climate, e.g. very mild and very harsh winters. In Frankfurt December 1934, January 1921 and February 1926 were the three mildest, and January 1940 and February 1929 were both the coldest winter months in over 100 years.”

Now get a load of their hypothesis for the cause!

Also cosmic causes, which are still mysterious to science, could be at play – changes in solar radiation and its composition. It appears to be much more than just a coincidence that the extreme weather year of 1947 just happened to be the biggest sunspot year in over 200 years. Periods of 80 and 110 year respectively have been detected.”

Message to scientists today: It’s the sun, stupid!

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7 responses to “Der Spiegel Warned Of Warming In 1948, Then Cooling In 1974, And Again Warming In 1986!”

  1. mindert eiting

    My mother told me that in the summer of 1947, when I was born, there were three terrible heat waves on a row. We have to conclude that the climate became disrupted right after WWII. There must be a link between these events.

    1. Ulrich Elkmann

      Atom bombs, of course, creating weird weather, as well as tornadoes. AMong others:
      “The Flint–Worcester Tornadoes were two tornadoes, one occurring in Flint, Michigan on June 8, 1953, the other in Worcester, Massachusetts on June 9, 1953. These tornadoes are among the deadliest in United States history and were caused by the same storm system that moved eastward across the nation.

      The tornadoes are also related together in the public mind because, for a brief period following the Worcester tornado, it was debated in the U.S. Congress whether recent atomic bomb testing in the upper atmosphere had caused the tornadoes. Congressman James E. Van Zandt (R-Penn.) was among several members of Congress who expressed their belief that the June 4th bomb testing created the tornadoes, which occurred far outside the traditional tornado alley. They demanded a response from the government.

      Meteorologists quickly dispelled such an assertion, and Congressman Van Zandt later retracted his statement.”

      http://www.bukisa.com/articles/330847_the-top-10-deadliest-tornadoes

  2. DirkH

    The people at Der Spiegel must be aware of this themselves, yet they keep spreading panic, surely knowing that this is just the way you sell papers. Just like the NYT, they must be complete cynicists.

  3. DirkH

    Blaming every extreme weather event on antropogenic CO2 becomes IPCC consensus for Durban. Believer article:
    http://www.wral.com/news/science/story/10321244/

  4. DirkH
  5. Captain Pithart

    Pierre,

    on occasions like this i like to show this picture around:

    http://img812.imageshack.us/img812/2489/scienceformul600px.jpg

    please learn the difference between science and pop culture.

    best!

    p.

  6. DirkH

    Forests not migrating northwards like the climate models require – meaning we should be very worried about the forests… (you can’t make this up.)
    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-10/du-fnk103111.php

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