Expert: German Coal Exit Will Cost 80 Billion Euros, But “Changes Europe CO2 Emissions By 0”

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The German government recently decided to exit from coal generated power by 2038, and now one expert says that the exit is going to cost handsomely, and bring zero result. Still, that 2038 target is too slow for some.

That’s how German politicians make decisions on things that concern the economy and environment. The German government’s aim of a coal phaseout is to contribute to protecting the climate. In reality, it will have no impact at all.

German online FOCUS magazine reports here: “80 billion euros are to be given to the affected regions and companies in the coming years as aid and compensation.”

But for some experts, the 2018 target date for completing the coal exit is too late, and thus risks seeing Germany emitting another 140 million tonnes of extra CO2 between 2020 and 2040 by exiting so slowly, so claims the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW).

To keep that 140 million ton figure in a global perspective, it is barely a drop in the bucket when compared to the 33 billion tonnes emitted globally and annually. The climate is not even going to notice it.

And over the next 20 years, global Co2 emissions could total 700 billion tonnes, which is a figure that is roughly 5000 times greater than the 140 million tons the DIW is bellyaching about and wishes to eliminate by speeding up the coal phaseout.

“The coal exit changes the CO2 emissions of the European Union by 0,” FOCUS quotes economics professor Christian Bayer of the University of Bonn at Twitter. “A German coal phase-out in itself only shifts emissions abroad.”

In summary, the 2038 coal exit will cost the German government (taxpayers) 80 billion euros, will have no effect on CO2 reductions, have no impact on climate, will ultimately lead to higher electricity costs, result in a more unstable grid, make Germany more dependent on foreign energy, and encourage companies to leave for places with more stable and cheaper electricity.

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13 responses to “Expert: German Coal Exit Will Cost 80 Billion Euros, But “Changes Europe CO2 Emissions By 0””

  1. Jerry

    Super Critical Boilers have the ability to scrub the coal emissions.

    friendofscience.org (Burning Questions)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0_63pdeVI0

    Co2 does not impact the climate and a higher level of atmospheric co2 benefits humanity by increasing agricultural production.

    http://co2coalition.org/2020/01/27/global-greening-by-dr-patrick-moore/

    https://climaterealityforum.com/ (Lord Monckton) (Tom Harris)

    There is no reason to end the use of coal for numerous reasons.

  2. Expert: German Coal Exit Will Cost 80 Billion Euros, But “Changes Europe CO2 Emissions By 0” — NoTricksZone - Climate- Science.press

    […] über Expert: German Coal Exit Will Cost 80 Billion Euros, But “Changes Europe CO2 Emissions By 0” —… […]

  3. Richard

    While I agree with the notion that Germany alone without coal will make no effect on climate, to think like this as a country in isolation is no longer valid. Australians have been arguing among themselves in a like manner for the last decade, but there seems to be a inexorable shift in thinking to “renewables are better, so lets abandon coal”. If enough countries think the same way and follow the trend, maybe there might be a reduction in CO2 emissions. But the situation will be even worse than the report in Focus magazine asserts. Not just Germany but the entire industrial west will be adversely affected and impoverished, to be replaced by the rise of east Asia. Where the USA might sit in this scenario will be decided by the forthcoming election for President at the end of this year.

  4. Aussie

    Sounds like the usual modus operandi for ‘alarmists’. Politicians pay colossal amounts of money for absolutely nothing. And German taxpayers foot the bill – it all has to be paid for! And all they get from this is a warm feeling that something has been done, higher tax bills and higher energy prices – but in fact nothing has taken place other than money has been massively wasted.

    And there is no proof that CO2 is the key agent in atmospheric warming – seems crazy to do something when you have no proof, but that is Climate Change today. Speaking of which looks like we are cooling here…not warming (see below)

    http://temperature.global/?fbclid=IwAR1mhZfsFG7WnZYOjTznx_Yvy-_MguXETmvV-cioDlJGGsEqNoWppwAMrUo

  5. Wind and sun at noon providing 23% of electricity in SE Australia | Catallaxy Files

    […] is just starting to work it out. From mem in the […]

  6. Paul Aubrin

    Eco-fascism is driving again Germany and all Europe into suicide.

  7. PetterT

    Imagine the chaos when people finally find out that we have been fooled, and new charlatans begin to promise to provide cheap power “but pay us money first”.

  8. Steve

    The only reason I see to develop new energy streams is that we will run out of Oil one day…when I have no idea?

  9. drumphish

    How to make everything go from ludicrous speed to plaid and make it look like salvation. lol

    Elon Musk to the rescue! Mow down thousands of trees, that’s the ticket!

    Nicht so schnell!

    Hold on, something ain’t right here.

    Solving The Ozone Problem Caused By Electric Cars

    “Ozone is a known pollutant at low levels in the earth’s atmosphere, which causes harmful effects on the respiratory system and sensitive plants. Ozone forms as hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides emitted into the air react with sunlight. Two of the largest emitters of these pollutants are vehicles and electricity generating units (EGUs) but as Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) have risen in popularity over the past decade the positive impact on the environment due to lack of fossil fuel exhaust fumes is offset by increased ozone.”

    500 million PHEVs will make matters worse.

    In the old days of plant engineering, the top floor of the building was the beginning point, the first floor rolled out the fresh newly assembled tractor ready for the field not ten miles out of town.

    The floors were 2x dimension lumber with spaces between each 2×12 or 14, the floors were swept clean from top to bottom, piece of cake.

    All parts were shipped to the city where the assembly building was located. The building had a small footprint, you could roll out tractor after tractor all day long in one building 150 x 100 feet five stories tall. It was a beautiful thing.

    You didn’t need no steee-king giga factory.

    The old adage ‘less is more’ is true.

    Not that difficult to get it right.

  10. Expert: German Coal Exit Will Cost 80 Billion Euros, But "Changes Europe CO2 Emissions By 0" | Un hobby...

    […] P. Gosselin, February 22, 2020 in […]

  11. Politisk utopism versus verkligheten - Klimatupplysningen

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  12. dennisambler

    “140 million tonnes of extra CO2 between 2020 and 2040”

    Just China’s increase from 2018 to 2019 was 260 million tonnes, their total for the year is then 10.32 billion tonnes, or 28.28 million tonnes per day. They would cover the German increase in just 9 days.

    http://www.globalcarbonatlas.org/en/CO2-emissions

    https://www.carbonbrief.org/analysis-global-fossil-fuel-emissions-up-zero-point-six-per-cent-in-2019-due-to-china

    “The growth of global emissions in 2019 was almost entirely due to China, which increased its CO2 output by 0.26GtCO2.

    https://climateactiontracker.org/countries/china/current-policy-projections/
    While 2018 marked the first year in four decades coal capacity outside of China declined (by 8.1 GW) due to retiring and decommissioning, China increased its coal capacity by 42.9 GW over the same period, thus raising the global coal fleet (Shearer, Yu and Nace, 2019).

    China’s continuing dedication to the fuel domestically and abroad is concerning.” [but not to China]

    China’s emissions have already increased by 6.25% since Paris, some 608 million tonnes, Germany’s emissions in 2018 were 759 million tonnes

  13. Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #411 | Watts Up With That?

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