German Electricity Prices Soar, Now Most Expensive In Europe …Taxes, Green Surcharges Make Up 53.6% Of Price!

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Thanks to the Energiewende (transition to green energies), which is tantamount to a vegan energy diet, Germany’s electricity prices have soared 27% over the past decade to become the most expensive in Europe, if not the world, according to the STROM-REPORT.

Strompreise in Europa 2020
Source: Infografik “Strompreise in Europa 2020”, STROM-REPORT.de, Creative Commons License CC-BY-ND

Taxes, surcharges and a catalogue of other fees make up 53.6% of Germany’s electricity price, only Denmark has a higher share at 67.8%. Only five European countries have seen electricity prices drop over the last 10 years.

Soaring prices in Latvia and Great Britain

No country has seen electricity rates rise more than in Latvia and Great Britain, where the price has risen a whopping 55% and 46% respectively over the past 10 years.

What’s behind the high electricity prices? According to the STROM-REPORT: “The biggest intra-European differences are caused by taxes and duties. The EU average is 36.6%. But the values vary from country to country and are highest in Denmark with 63.7%. In Germany, where the government-induced price components also account for more than half [52.3%] of the price, the EEG levy, which enables the expansion of renewable energies, is included at 21.5%.”




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8 responses to “German Electricity Prices Soar, Now Most Expensive In Europe …Taxes, Green Surcharges Make Up 53.68 Of Price!”

  1. bonbon

    Ye ain’t seen nothin’ yet!
    Just look what the EU is up to :
    A digital euro? European Central Bank assessing safe alternative to cryptocurrencies
    https://www.euronews.com/2020/10/02/a-digital-euro-european-central-bank-assessing-safe-alternative-to-cryptocurrencies
    and
    https://www.ecb.europa.eu/euro/html/digitaleuro.en.html

    Couched in central bankers jargon, ex Bank of England chief Mark Carney, now UN Climate Advisor, let the cat out of the crypt when proposing a FED digital currency to replace the Dollar last August:

    “For a decade, the central banks had tried to inflate the dollar by printing fiat money, and failed; therefore, it should be replaced in reserve currency functions by a global digital currency which central banks could inflate or deflate as they wished, by creating or destroying block-chain currency.”

    So in the name of the European Peoples Digital currency they are going to inflate as they see fit!
    Just imagine what that will do to energy prices, digitally extorted of course. Many in Germany still remember 1923.

  2. cementafriend

    Notice Poland which uses coal has a low electricity cost. Not sure why Hungary has a low cost and a reduction in the price over the last year. Do they use Russian coal or Russian natural gas?

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