New Study Finds Russian Sea Levels Were 7-9 Meters Higher Than Today From 8000-4000 Years Ago

Share this...

The belief that modern sea levels and sea level change rates are unprecedentedly high takes another hit.

Per a new study, sea levels were ~9.5 m higher than today about 8000 years ago (White Sea, northwestern Russia), then fell to ~7 m higher than today by around 4000 years ago.

From that point in the Middle Holocene, the sea levels plummeted (by 7 m) to the present. Today’s sea levels are likely the lowest since the last glaciation in this region.

Early Holocene sea level change rates ranged from 35 to 100 mm per year. Compare this to the 1.56 mm per year change rates experienced from 1900-2018 (Frederikse et al., 2020).

Image Source: Kublitskiy et al., 2023

This study (Kublitskiy et al., 2023) also reveals the modern sea ice coverage in this region is the highest it has been (~4 mo./year duration) in the last 6000 years. There were Holocene centuries (e.g., the Roman and Medieval Warm Periods) when this region was sea-ice free year-round (~0 mo./year).

Image Source: Kublitskiy et al., 2023
Share this...

3 responses to “New Study Finds Russian Sea Levels Were 7-9 Meters Higher Than Today From 8000-4000 Years Ago”

  1. John Hultquist
  2. dm

    7-9 meters? That is all?

    Maine’s sea level was 70 meters (about 230 feet) HIGHER 13,000 yrs ago. The Gulf of Maine continued 100+ miles up what is now the Penobscot River valley. It did so 1000+ years BEFORE the end of the Last Glacial Period!! Imagine the flooding that occurred while the glaciers melted.

    One more point: The Last Glacial Period ended while indigenous people everywhere RELIED on biomass to warm their homes and cook their food. Col. Drake drilled the first oil well thousands of years later.

  3. Bjorn Lomborg: Actions That Would Do More Good Than Wasting Trillions on Climate Change – Newsfeed Hasslefree Allsort

    […] New Study Finds Russian Sea Levels Were 7-9 Meters Higher Than Today From 8000-4000 Years Ago […]

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this. More information at our Data Privacy Policy

Close