Melting Canadian Snows Uncover Medieval And Roman Warm Periods

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Melting mountain snow in the Canadian Mackenzie Mountains has uncovered ancient weapons used by early hunters. In the Canadian Mackenzie Mountains scientists have found weapons up to 2400 years old, reports Tom Andrews of the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre in Yellowknife and his colleagues in a press release from the Arctic Institute of North America.

http://www.arctic.ucalgary.ca/main/documents/media_release_pdfs/Melting%20ice%20reveals%20ancient%20artifacts.pdf

 Scientists suspect that hunters followed herds escaping mosquitoes and heat during the hot summers. Caribou was an important food source.

 The results of their findings have been extraordinary. Andrews and his team have found 2400-year-old spear throwing tools, a 1000-year-old ground squirrel snare, and bows and arrows dating back 850 years. Biologists involved in the project are examining caribou dung for plant remains, insect parts, pollen and caribou parasites. It is very likely that snow and ice today still covers more ancient relicts.

 The findings and their dates of origin undercut warmists’ claims that the Medieval Warm Period did not exist, or was localised in Europe, and that today’s warm period is unprecedented. The age of the found artefacts correspond to the Roman Warm Period and the Medieval Warm Period.  Ancient artefacts recovered in the Alps tell the same story.

H/T: http://klimakatastrophe.wordpress.com/

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