The German Greens’ Ultra-Useful Political Imbeciles

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If you support your enemies, then you ought not wonder why they grow stronger and soon defeat you.

The early results of the Bremen state elections are in, and once again the conservative CDU Party took one on the chin, and in the gut, and again the Greens soared, read here. The German state of Bremen will now be governed by a solid majority coalition of socialist Reds and environmental Greens. As for the conservative CDU party, it has tumbled behind the Greens to 3rd place, picking up only a measly 20% of the vote.

A similar election debacle took place just weeks earlier in the German industrial state of Baden Wurttemberg, where the Greens, who were once just a fringe party, swept to power after 60 years of conservative CDU rule. Angela Merkel’s conservative CDU party is now a collapsing house of cards.

Even the CDU’s coalition partner, the business-friendly FDP Free Democrats, have been reduced to a mere asterisk in the polls, falling well below the 5% hurdle and are now an insignificant political force.

Why are the Greens flying high and the Conservatives and Free Democrats plummeting?

To answer that question, it is helpful to play out a scenario in your mind. Imagine if the Angela Merkel’s conservative CDU one day adopted a new plank in its platform: “Jobs for Germans” and “Foreigners stay out!” What would be the result?

This would tantamount to a mainstream party endorsing and legitimising an extreme fringe ideology, an ideology that deserves defeat and not support. Such an endorsement however would be an immediate boost for Germany’s far-right brownish parties, who would be propelled and zoom in the polls overnight. The CDU on the other hand would deservedly go into a tailspin.

This is what happened with the CDU and the Greens. The Greens in Germany 15 years ago were a just minor party that struggled to reach the 5% hurdle in state and national elections. But over the years, the big parties like the conservative CDU began adopting and endorsing politically-correct green positions on energy and climate change rather than opposing them. The green political-correctness, they thought, would make them more appealing. The result: green fringe positions became viewed by the public as having been legitimised, and so people began to view the Greens as mainstream. Acceptance grew.

Today many people are green to a certain extent – it’s hip after all. So when going to the polls, why vote for the CDU when you can vote for the real deal: the Greens!

Successful politics is not about supporting the kooky fringe positions of your opponents and so legitimising them. No – it is about exposing them for what they really are, and then hanging them around the necks of your opponents and parading them through the public. But if you stupidly support the positions of your opponents, then you ought not wonder why they they keep getting stronger.

The CDU naively believed green voters would gravitate to their ranks if they adopted fuzzy green positions. But that didn’t happen. Indeed the opposite occurred in that the green positions looked more attactive, and so voters migrated to the Greens instead.

The same happened in the USA when Newt Gingrich gave the climate movement his stamp of approval by cozying up with Nancy Pelosi on a sofa. Republican Arnold Schwarzenegger did the same by adopting extreme green beliefs, and even became more green than a number of Democrats. In the end, along with a host of other RINOs, they only became extremely valuable useful imbeciles for the Democrats. The GOP paid a heavy price.

Endorsing the kooky climate positions espoused by Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats neither strengthened Newt nor the Republicans. To the contrary, it glorified the freak positions of the Democrats, who only grew stronger at the GOP’s expense.

“Thanks for the climate support Newt!” —- “Thanks for all the help Arnie!”

German useful political imbeciles for the Greens

Chancellor Angela Merkel took her endorsement of green to an extreme by having Hans Schellnhuber of the crackpot Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) act as her close advisor on climate change. Merkel even once said that climate change is humanity’s greatest threat and challenge.  Merkel’s Environment Minister Norbert Röttgen (CDU) is also a huge proponent of going green – in order to save the planet.

What better way to make the Greens look like genuine heroes?

Today CDU leaders are scratching their heads wondering why the Greens have passed them in the polls. How much more clueless can one get?

Even the FDP’s new party leader Philipp Rösler has been exposed as a political punk with no qualms about prostituting himself and his FDP party to green industry lobbyists. Where is the FDP today? The party is reduced to just an asterisk in the polls – a political laughing stock. They can’t figure it out.

It’s your constant endorsement of the opposition, stupid!

Getting back to success

To get back to successful politics, the first step is to stop endorsing the absurd positions of your opponents. Then you have reject them and expose the fraud and the corruption that is the science of climate change, and the utter folly of controlling climate by fiddling with one single trace gas. Now is the time to expose the green filth, the junk science, the web of cronyism, and the dead-end it is all taking us to. The first party that does that will be the first to climb back to prominence.

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12 responses to “The German Greens’ Ultra-Useful Political Imbeciles”

  1. DirkH

    Very correct analysis. Especially Röttgen (federal minister for the environment) is a one man green freakshow.
    Just a few days ago he posited that “the further increase of renewable energy will only increase electricity prizes for consumers by another 0.2 Eurocent per kWh.”
    http://www.focus.de/politik/weitere-meldungen/oekostrom-roettgen-rechnet-mit-nur-geringen-zusatzkosten_aid_628687.html

    Let’s see. Assuming we get another 5 GW peak performance of PV installed in 2011 – i consider that a low estimate – and assuming 800 hours of peak production of solar power in the German climate, we will have to pay for another 4 GWh a year, with a current Feed In Tariff of 30 cent and a bulk value of a kWh of 5 cent; so we will have to give the PV owners 25 cent times 4 billion for this newly constructed capacity alone; resulting in 1 bn Euros on top of what we already pay (16bn Euros a year) for the existing installations. Assuming 40 million households (at 80 mill population) this means 25 Euros per year and household; assuming a household consumes 2,500 kWh per year that’s 1 cent per kWh, not 0.2 as Röttgen claims; and that’s for PV installed in 2011 alone.

    What do you do with such people. He deserves an honorary free membership in the Green party and a Nobel prize for post-normal arithmetics.

    1. DirkH

      Oh, sorry, typo, but doesn’t change the conclusion: 5 GW newly installed peak performance PV produces 4 billion kWh a year, not 4 GWh a year under German insolation.

      1. DirkH

        Oh, and nobody in the media will question Röttgens funny numbers. This is the sorry state of the land of the “poets and thinkers”.

        Probably the thinkers all made off to Canada and Oz. Gotta hurry. Wait, keep a place for me free…

  2. R. de Haan

    Not only the German electorate is more or less “hysterical”and so is German politics.

    With the current EU crises escalating there is not much to be achieved by the Greens or any other political party. All they can do is dig a hole just like Merkel did. More and more people turn their back on politics and the establishment an this now includes the Greens.

    So here I have a question:
    Which party is going to be the honest broker ending the climate scam and cutting of the totalitarians of the EU and the UN?

    There is no such party at this moment in time and there are not sufficient “thinking” voters who will bring it to power.

    If we had sufficient “thinking” voters we wouldn’t be in such a mess.

  3. Edward

    PG,

    Good logic here Pierre.

    Not good for Germany at all, the electorate are kicking Merkel [unsurprising] but going further left – lets not beat about the bush – Greens = eco-Marxism.

    I fear this slime green neurosis is becoming apparent in Britain, to a certain extent.

    We lack a coherent and valid alternative to ‘green slime politics’ – which all the centre parties espouse, only UKIP are truly anti-green + anti EU but make no headway in the polls.
    The green party won it’s first sitting MP at the last general election – I cling to the hope that the ‘real’ Brits will one day, stand up and be counted – but fear this will take a revolution to happen.
    At least we rid ourselves of the AV voting system* – that would have been curtains for Britain, conversely though it would have benefited UKIP?!

    *Yep, they gave us a referendum on something we never asked for and denied us a chance to vote on: our continued membership of the EU – they knew what the resounding answer would be – Fork OFF!!

    Worrying indeed.

  4. AB400

    In early 2000, after SPD and Greens (“red-green”) had raised gasoline taxes (for no other reason than to get us our of our cars and onto bicycles), the FDP went out to gas stations to expose the new 2 marks a liter price record.

    Today, they should be out there exposing the great electricity rip-off going on in Germany. Under red-green’s policies and then *former environment minister* Angela Merkels inaction to reverse them, it has reached enormous proportions: electricity prices have almost doubled over the last 10 year. “Yello Strom” started out selling “cheap” (it was by German standards) power in the year 2000 for 0.13 Euro/kwh. Today the very same company, from the same website, offers power for 0.25 Euros/kwh.

    In every kilowatt hour German consumers purchase, over 50% of the price is just for taxes:

    – 19% VAT tax (about 4 cent/kwh at current prices)
    – 2 cent/kwh “electricity tax” (guess what that is spent for)
    – 2 cent/kwh taxes of local communities
    – 3.53 cent/kwh tax for subsidizing renewable energy

    That’s about 0.115 Euros per kwh, or $0.16 USD per kwh, just as a penalty for consuming energy. Few if any of this goes to actual infrastructure that keeps the lights on.

    But wait, it gets better! These numbers don’t even include the “stealth tax” of Feed In Tariffs (FIT), forced buying of all electricity produced by solar and wind installations at 5 times the market price, to be paid in full by the German consumers. The FIT for solar alone is estimated to have cost $80 billion Euros already and given the increased installed capacity, is estimated to cost at least another $120 billion Euros over the next 10 years.

    Online service “Check24” has been seen advertising a yellow red logo that looks akin to the familiar “nuclear power no thanks” but says “expensive power no thanks”. That’s a start, we need more of it.

    1. DirkH

      Here is a detailed breakdown of the energy end prize for private consumers and small companies (less than 70,000 kWh a year):
      http://www.solarserver.de/solar-magazin/nachrichten/aktuelles/2011/kw06/anstieg-der-strompreise-kuenftig-kaum-durch-den-ausbau-erneuerbarer-energien-getrieben.html

      Ignore the text, it’s the typical wishful thinking by the renewables lobby.
      34% are for generating the electricity (this does not pay for the renewables subsidy); 21% pay for the grid infrastructure operators. 8% are for the renewables cross subsidy.

      1. DirkH

        Oh, the grafic is from 2010; cross subsidy was 2.5 cent back then, so that explains the discrepancy. IOW the cross subsidy grew from 8 % to about 15% in one year; that’s 90%growth annualy so if it continues to grow like that it’s buh-bye industry and hello candles.

  5. Stop Common Purpose

    Yes, DirkH, ‘freakshow’ just about sums these people up.

    Mr Delingpole in the UK’s Telegraph calls the Greens ‘watermelons’. Green on the outside and red on the inside.

    http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/author/jamesdelingpole/

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