Two Economists Warn Germany Will See “Completely Different Demonstrations” On Friday As Climate Hysteria Demolishes Industry

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The German automobile industry today continues to be the real engine driving the country’s economy, but that may dramatically change for the worse – soon – according to economists Matthias Weik and Marc Friedrich in a commentary at the online news portal of the (German Midsize Companies News – DMN).

The two authors focus on the economic direction of the German economy and how it is seriously threatened by the country’s obsession with climate protection and how policymakers are neglecting its key industry: automobiles.

Weik and Friedrich say that German policymakers are naive, and are in the process of ruining the German economy in their panic to rescue the planet from an alleged climate meltdown.

“Everybody is talking about the climate, yet no one is talking about the economic climate,” Weik and Friedrich say.

“Hard as nails” recession threatens Germany

The two economists warn of a coming recession, one that will be “hard as nails” as the ecological activist onslaught on German industry picks up.

According to the Weik and Friedrich, already “the seasonally adjusted and real order intake of German industry fell by 8.6 percent compared to the same month last year! For the tenth month in a row it is going down!”

“Companies such as Deutsche Bank, BASF, Bayer, Siemens, Thyssen, Ford have begun “massive job cuts or announced plans to do so”.

The two authors say that new buzzwords, such as “unemployment” and “layoffs”, will soon be dominating the media and that “no one will talk about the shortage of skilled workers any more, let alone climate change”.

Climate activist policymakers “negligently gamble away” prosperity 

They write that the outlook for Germany’s key industry, automobiles, “is pitch-black” as the assault against the internal combustion engine continues unrelentingly.

The authors write: “If we actually continue to destroy our car industry – which accounts for 21 percent of our GDP – then everyone must be aware of the consequences.”

These consequences would mean economic shock waves not only for Germany, but also for Europe which massively relies on revenues generated by the German automotive industry, the authors explain.

Weik and Friedrich write that Germany’s policies “negligently gamble away” prosperity and that the “coming climate change in the economy will nip all irrelevant sham debates in the bud.”

“People in the streets”…”different demonstrations on Fridays”

They add: “The heated discussions and hysteria are a sign of the famous late Roman decadence and a warning sign of the crash. For many who demonstrate today, there will be no jobs in Germany tomorrow.”

Weik and Friedrich warn that as the “economic climate changes drastically and more and more people are standing in the streets without work […] we will see completely different demonstrations on Fridays. But then it will be too late.”

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9 responses to “Two Economists Warn Germany Will See “Completely Different Demonstrations” On Friday As Climate Hysteria Demolishes Industry”

  1. Edward Caryl

    The largest BMW plant in the world is in Greer SC USA.

  2. Graeme No.3

    The trouble will be worse because so many of the activists are employed by the Government, either directly or indirectly, and believe that they cannot suffer. Politicians are surrounded by such advisors, all believing they know best, and convinced that all the Government has to do is spend more money. They will do their utmost to delay changes in policy.
    When the money runs out they will have a very rude shock.

  3. Chris Hanley

    This looks crazy: Porsche is planning to produce its most popular model, the Macan, as all-electric only and that is bound to limit the export market due to the limited range of all-electric vehicles and lack of infrastructure outside densely populated first-world countries.

  4. RickWill

    Wow, what a surprise. Who could have forecast this!

    Actually, I believe quite a few people saw this coming.

    It would not be so bad for Germany if all other developed economies were also trying to supply their electricity grids from fairy farts. Trump has slowed the rot in the US. China, Korea and Japan might bow to the Climate priests but do whatever is best for their economies. India does whatever it can to keep improving living standards. UK does not matter as it manufactures little and lives on its standing as a the financial go between for industries across the globe.

    We may see Germany trying to influence the 2020 US election in order to see the end of Trump and his unfashionable America First strategy. Germany PMI is in steady decline; now with industry contraction:
    https://tradingeconomics.com/germany/manufacturing-pmi
    Now at 43.2.
    The US PMI is also reducing after a period of strong growth but manufacturing still expanding:
    https://tradingeconomics.com/united-states/manufacturing-pmi
    Now at 50.4.

  5. pochas94

    Merkel has got to realize that these extreme climate “remedies” are seriously damaging Germany economically while the supposed benefits are not now and may never happen.

  6. dennisambler

    “Companies such as Deutsche Bank, BASF, Bayer, Siemens, Thyssen, Ford have begun “massive job cuts or announced plans to do so”.

    Meanwhile,
    https://www.thyssenkrupp.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/thyssenkrupp-climate-targets-approved—science-based-and-in-line-with-global-climate-agreement–14656.html

    “The Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) has approved thyssenkrupp’s climate targets. At the same time the organization has confirmed that thyssenkrupp is acting in line with the goals of the 2015 Paris climate conference, where the international community agreed to limit future global warming to well below two degrees.

    The SBTi is a collaboration between CDP, the United Nations Global Compact, World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). Its aim is to establish science-based climate targets as standard business practice, by defining and promoting best practice in science-based target setting. To this end, the targets defined by companies are subject to an extensive independent assessment based on the latest climate science. There are today only 10 German companies whose climate targets have been approved by the SBTi.”

  7. The Man at the Back

    There are very many useful idiot foot soldiers in the climate alarmism camp – but it is almost as if most western politicians actually want to destroy our industries and thus our economies !!!!

    Oh! wait a minute.

    I don’t usually subscribe to the conspiracy theory, preferring the cock-up theory, but is this all part of UN Agenda 21 ??

    I found this an interesting read over at Science Matters Blog by Ron Clutz recently

    https://rclutz.wordpress.com/2019/08/17/too-many-people-or-too-few/

    I believe that they are not the only demographers starting to see a shift.

    “The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance – it is the illusion of knowledge”.

    Daniel_J_Boorstin_

  8. cementafriend

    Germany is already looking like a poor country see this
    Global Wealth USD mean wealth/adult
    1 Switzerland $530,244
    2 Australia $411,060
    3 USA $403,974
    4 Belgium $313,945
    .
    .
    19 Germany $214,893

    When the last rich German closes the door to go to Switzerland where at least some speak German then the wealth will go further down to developing country status.

  9. Yonason

    A “green” economy is a suicidal economy. More and more people are becoming aware of that.
    https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2019/08/green-energy-is-sinister.php

    Hopefully as awareness increases, momentum will build to a point that we’ll be able to put an end to that madness.

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