Global Sales Of Electric Cars “Collapsed” Says New Report By PricewaterhouseCoopers… -15.7% In China

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Sales of so-called environmentally friendly electric cars have been slumping, despite all the Friday protests and loud cries for cleaner mobility.

Citing a report released by PricewaterhouseCoopers, German news portal t-online.de here reports how “suddenly demand is in the basement: even in China – the world’s largest market for e-cars – sales figures are collapsing”.

It turns out electric cars, with their long charging times, short range and surprisingly high CO2 lifetime budget, are still not attractive enough to consumers in these times of “climate crisis”.

Though sales have picked up in Germany somewhat, but that it’s still “at a very low level,” T-Online reports.

Climate protests, hysteria, fail to sway

Germany is one of the leading Fridays For Future protest countries worldwide, with tens of thousands of protesters turning out weekly. Yet that has not translated into any meaningful change in terms of electric car sales. People have not been swayed by all the climate hysteria and remain uncomfortable with all the technical and environmental drawbacks of plug-in electric cars. Read here.

Big markets dive

T-Online sees the really big trouble for electric cars elsewhere, that is in the markets where they have been traditionally strong: China, Norway and the USA. The German news site reports: “And that’s where the wind has changed, according to a report by management consultants PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC).”

Global: plug in electric fell 23.8%!

“According to the report, 321,573 battery-powered electric cars were sold worldwide in the third quarter of 2019. This is a decline of 2.8 percent compared to the previous year. Sales of plug-in hybrids even fell by a quarter (23.8 percent) to 102,097 units sold. There are various reasons for this,” reports T-Online.

Huge sales drop in China

T-Online reports that the world’s largest market for electric cars, China, “collapsed drastically between July and September 2019.” Adding: ” Sales of electric cars fell by 15.7 percent, of hybrid cars by 20 percent and of plug-in hybrids by as much as 27.3 percent.”

20% Q3 drop in US

Things are not better in the USA. Recently S&P Global reported: “Sales in the US plug-in vehicle market in Q3 2019 were down roughly 20% compared with Q3 2018, but year-to-date sales for 2019 were slightly ahead of sales through the third quarter in 2018.”

Future of electric plug-ins uncertain

Overall there’s growing uncertainty when it comes to the future of mobility and as to which technology will emerge as the most viable, and when.

Countries worldwide are woefully lagging behind in the installation of electric car infrastructure. Policymakers are thus uneasy about investing hundreds of billions into an electric car infrastructure, knowing that it may well be made obsolete by other fuels, such as hydrogen. Investment delays in turn lead to delays in sales.

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20 responses to “Global Sales Of Electric Cars “Collapsed” Says New Report By PricewaterhouseCoopers… -15.720 In China”

  1. Yonason
  2. Dave Ward

    “Countries worldwide are woefully lagging behind in the installation of electric car infrastructure”

    How different to when internal combustion engines were first fitted to vehicles. Governments didn’t install a network of filling stations – they were built as a result of consumer demand, and with private investment, NOT taxpayer funded subsidies…

  3. John F. Hultquist

    We went to a Costco Warehouse gas station in the Puget Sound (Seattle) area near Exit 15 of I-90. This was Saturday at about 4:30 pm.
    There were 10 lines — 2 hosed each, with about 4 or 5 cars moving through, and this was that way when we arrived and when we left.
    I got 14+ gallons in about 4 minutes, once started. Most folks seemed to be doing about the same.
    At 5 minute refills and 20 hoses, that’s 240 autos per hour.
    I can go 450 miles (725 km) on that tank full.
    As far as I know EVs do not come close to these numbers.

    1. SebastianH

      EVs wouldn’t need to go to something like a Costco Warehouse to recharge though. They rarely need to recharge on the go if ever. Most of the charging will happen at home or at where ever the car is parked for extended periods of time. Don’t you agree?

  4. Don from OZ

    Why knock electric cars? I know they currently have some shortcomings but they also have some advantages.
    I don’t care about the climate crap which will in time fade into oblivion and the sooner the better.
    But the development of the EV is a separate issue smoother, quieter, simpler, less moving parts, lower maintenance than an ICE, better braking when used in regeneration mode.
    Here in New south Wales, Australia the NRMA (National Roads Motorists Association)which principally provides break down and recovery services has bitten the bullet and is installing a network of fast charging stations along with RACQ (Royal Automobile Club Queensland) and RACV (Royal Automobile Club Victoria).
    This is just the beginning of a new future in motoring so let’s give it a chance. We may well all be better off if far more research and development goes ahead at a pace even half of what has been put into Internal Combustion Engines.
    I would also welcome an electric tractor to work my paddocks.
    This topic is about the only good thing to have emerged from the AGW fiasco – it’s an ill wind that blows no good.

    1. Yonason

      “This is just the beginning of a new future in motoring so let’s give it a chance.”

      Agreed. On condition…

      I have no problem with that, as long as the free market is allowed to take it’s course, and the govt doesn’t waste public funds on it and force us to embrace it long before it’s ready for prime time, assuming it ever will be.

    2. Georg Thomas

      Don from OZ,

      You write: ” … so let’s give it a chance.”

      No one is hindering the development of EV.

      You write also: “… the only good thing to have emerged from the AGW fiasco …”

      As if engineers et al had needed the AGW fiasco to think about EV – rationally.

      No, it is not “a good thing” to destroy well-developed industries by enforcing virtue signalling fads. Fads? After decades of selling EV as THE solution, the Greens oppose them now (another trick to destroy the economy, having forced car makers to spend billions on cars they don’t want to make?), promoting a new fad: hydrogen.

      Even if EV or hydrogen-powered cars were a reasonable proposition, the problem is that green industrial policy dominates commercial and engineering rationality. Meaning: even if the ultimate goal of green industrial policy were not to destroy the economy, the irrational nature of green magical thinking will.

      1. Yonason

        “green industrial policy dominates commercial and engineering rationality. Meaning:…”

        Meaning that the lunatics are running the asylum.

      2. SebastianH

        “green magical thinking” and the goal being destroying the economy … puh. So much idiocy in a few sentences really hurts the readers mind.

        Hydrogen is wasteful for powering transport that can stop to recharge in regular intervals. If – like the author – you feel that EVs have “surprisingly high CO2 lifetime budget”, then wait for the time you realize what the use of hydrogen does to that budget.

        No one is hindering the development of EV.

        Indeed. But you guys are surely advocating for not supporting it, aren’t you? And you guys are inventing reasons for why we shouldn’t support it.

    3. A C Osborn

      I am amazed that you think EVs are “new Technology”.
      They have been around longer than ICE vehicles.
      If you think that they are a good thing that is OK, but don’t try to ban ICE vehicles, no subsidies for EVs, let the market decide.
      I suggest you do a little research on the Mining that is being done by kids to supply the Materials for their batteries though as it is anything but “green”.

      1. SebastianH

        I suggest you do a little research on the Mining that is being done by kids to supply the Materials for their batteries though as it is anything but “green”.

        You are likely talking about cobalt, aren’t you? Please look up what percentage of the cobalt mining activities is used for producing car batteries and then look up what the rest is used for. You will be surprised …

  5. BoyfromTottenham

    “Policymakers are thus uneasy about investing hundreds of billions into an electric car infrastructure, knowing that it may well be made obsolete by other fuels, such as hydrogen.”
    Now that comment shows some common sense (except for the bit about hydrogen)!
    I guess that in the early days of IC vehicles before gas stations, drivers could figure out the need to carry their own fuel supply for the distance they needed to travel. It seems that helpless EV drivers need mommy to hold their hand…

    1. SebastianH

      It seems that helpless EV drivers need mommy to hold their hand…

      I find it fascinating how you imagine the first days of IC cars to have happened vs. the EV situation of today 😉

      Why the hate?

  6. drumphish

    Remember when Ford recalled all of those electric powered pickup trucks and the lease holders were disappointed?

    All that has to happen is to run low on the charge and you begin to panic hoping you will make it home. If you don’t, there is a problem.

    EVs then become the problem, you’ll need a tow. Then you advertise the EV for sale, there is a greater fool.

    The story of EVs, plus, Teslas somehow, from time to time, want to catch fire. And then the fire doesn’t want to go out, reignites. Another problem you don’t want to experience.

    The expiration date on EVs hasn’t arrived yet.

    Read Eric Peters report on Harley Davidson’s Livewire, it doesn’t inspire the Average Joe to buy battery-powered vehicles. The comments are revealing, doesn’t bode well for the automotive industry.

    https://www.ericpetersautos.com/2018/11/13/the-electric-suicide-of-harley-davidson/

  7. Globální prodeje elektrovozů „zkolabovaly“, říká nová zpráva PricewaterhouseCooper, třeba v Číně o -15,7% - Reformy.cz
  8. scott allen

    Here is a break down of the cost of owning a EV vs Gas powered vehicle. An Ev will cost between 10,000 to 15,000 dollars more to purchase (for a side to side break down of cost, look at the VW Golf and the Golf EV). At a sales tax rate of 7% (most states are higher) the extra cost would be 700 to 1,050 dollars. To wire your house for a level 2 EVSE service. cost between 800 to 1,300 dollars. Most states charge a yearly fee of 150 to 300 dollars road use taxes for EV’s. For a total of 13,000 to 20,350 in extra cost. Using the EPA cost of electricity and milage (between 2.83 and 6.29 per 100 miles) the cost for 12,000 miles (the national average) over 10 years would be between 3,396 and 7,548. In the first 10 years an EV will cost between 16,396 and 27,898 to own and operate.

    There are no extra cost for a gas powered vehicle. If the gas powered vehicle gets 30 MPG and drives the national average of 12,000 miles a year, it would use 400 gallons of gas at a cost per gallon of between 2.50 and 3.00 dollars. Add 39 dollars for oil changes, 120 dollars in a year. Over 10 years that would be 11,200 dollars up to 13,200 dollars to own and operate.

    So it takes over 15 years to break even for a EV vs gas powered vehicle, if you drive less than 12,000 miles a year you probably never make up the difference

    1. Yonason

      And the Govt wants to mandate them. Oh, Joy.
      ___________________________________________

      Dear Govt.

      Impoverish me, please. And step on it!
      ___________________________________________

  9. Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #385 | Watts Up With That?
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    […] Global Sales Of Electric Cars “Collapsed” Says New Report By PricewaterhouseCoopers&#823… […]

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