Earth’s Mean Temperature Falling, Planetary Alignment Suspected As Driver Of The 11-Year Solar Cycle

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Image: NASA Earth Observatory. Public Domain

Prof. Fritz Vahrenholt’s Monthly Solar Report

The global mean temperature in April 2020 was again significantly lower than in February and March, at 0.38°C above the average from 1981 to 2010. The average temperature increase on the globe from 1981 to February 2020 was 0.14°C per decade. The further development promises to be interesting, especially since a number of research institutes expect a higher probability of a cooling La Nina in the Pacific towards the end of the year. March’s solar activity was very low with a sunspot number of 1.5.  Activity in April rose slightly to 5.4. The first sunspots of the new cycle are showing.

What causes the sun to have an 11-year cycle?

Since the Dessau pharmacist Heinrich Samuel Schwabe discovered in 1843 that the sunspots of the sun increase and decrease in an 11-year cycle, science has been puzzling over the reason why this cycle lasts 11 years and why the solar magnetic field also changes its polarity in this rhythm: the north pole becomes the south pole and vice versa.

In July last year, scientists at the Helmholtz Centre in Dresden Rossendorf made a little-noticed but exciting discovery. Every 11.07 years, the planets Venus, Earth and Jupiter are aligned quite precisely. At this point in time, their gravitational force acts jointly in one direction on the Sun.

“The agreement is amazingly accurate: we see a complete parallelism with the planets over 90 cycles,” explains Frank Stefani, one of the authors of the publication published in Solar Physics. Just as the gravitational pull of the Moon causes the tides on Earth, planets could move the hot plasma on the surface of the Sun. But the effect of a simple gravitational force is too weak to significantly disturb the flow in the Sun’s interior, so the temporal coincidence has long been ignored.

Now the researchers assume that the layers of the plasma are subject to a Taylor instability. The Taylor instability is known from the behavior of liquids of different densities at their interface (we know the turbulence that occurs when milk is poured into a cup of tea).  Taylor instability is sensitive to even very small forces. A small burst of energy is enough for the polarity of the solar magnetic field to swing back and forth every 11 years. The necessary impulse for this could be provided by the tidal action of the planets – and thus ultimately determine the rhythm in which the sun’s magnetic field reverses its polarity.

The tidal forces of the planets could have other effects on the Sun in addition to their role as pace-setter for the 11-year cycle. For example, it would be conceivable that they could change the stratification of the plasma in the boundary area between the inner radiation zone and the outer convection zone of the Sun, the tachocline, in such a way that the magnetic flux could be more easily dissipated.

Under these conditions, the strength of the activity cycles could also change, just as the “Maunder Minimum” once caused a significant decrease in solar activity over a longer period, the researchers write on the Helmholtz Center website. It is an unusual idea that the activity of the sun is controlled by the planets, including the earth itself. This sounds like astrology – but it is the latest in solar research.

One of the first researchers who assumed an influence of the solar activity by the planets was Theodor Landscheidt, who already in 1988 in his book “Sun-Earth-Man” predicted the decreasing strength of the solar cycles 22 and following. However, he assumed a different mechanism, according to which the planets cyclically move the sun out of the center of gravity (barycenter) of our solar system. Landscheidt died in 2004.

And also in our book “The Forgotten Sun” we had invited Prof. Nicola Scafetta for a separate chapter, who already then interpreted the conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter as the cause of a 60-year cycle. In a publication published in Solar Physics in February 2020, he also relates the longer-term oscillations (Hallstatt -2400 years ,Eddy – 1000 years, Suess-de Vries – 210 years) to influences of the large planets of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The long version is accessible here.

Fritz Vahrenholt




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13 responses to “Earth’s Mean Temperature Falling, Planetary Alignment Suspected As Driver Of The 11-Year Solar Cycle”

  1. Earth’s Mean Temperature Falling, Planetary Alignment Suspected As Driver Of The 11-Year Solar Cycle — NoTricksZone | Climate- Science.press

    […] über Earth’s Mean Temperature Falling, Planetary Alignment Suspected As Driver Of The 11-Year Solar Cyc… […]

  2. Steve

    Very interesting..thanks

  3. JMR

    “The global mean temperature in April 2020 was again significantly lower than in February and March, at 0.38°C above the average from 1981 to 2010.”

    Why 1981-2010? What’s magic about those years? And why a 30-year average? Wouldn’t 50 years be more meaningful, or 100 if possible?

    1. John Dawson

      I think you’ll find it’s related to Dr Roy Spencer’s lower troposphere satellite temperature data – if you are not familiar with this just google his name to find the website and the graph.

  4. John F. Hultquist

    climatological standard normals

    As the world became more “connected” discussions about reporting weather information (& climate) became international in scope. This was back in the 1920s and 1930s. It was also before digital computers so working with massive sets of numbers was time intensive. [With modern computers and automated systems there is diversity in how reporting is now done.]

    People reporting weather information wanted some consistency and wanted to report numbers a person reading a newspaper could relate to.

    The 30 year interval was selected by international agreement, based on the recommendations of the International Meteorological Conference in Warsaw in 1933. At its 1934 Wiesbaden meeting the technical commission designated the thirty-year period from 1901 to 1930 as the reference time frame for climatological standard normals.
    Now there is the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

    It was decided to use a 30 year interval for comparisons, only when a decade ended (years ending in ‘0’).
    Examples: 1971-2000; 1981-2010; and next 1991-2020

    The following page shows (on the left) three sets of “normals” from which you can select. The table supplied if for the Period of Record : 09/06/1946 to 06/09/2016.
    http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?wa9465

    Many people question the use of the word “normal.”
    In fact, ‘normal’ also means perpendicular and has been used in giving title to a school where teacher training is the main goal – places such as Clarion Normal School, and many others.
    There are definitions of sand, silt, and clay. There is a definition for vampire and another for doppelgänger.
    There is a definition for climate normals. You may not like the definition nor the word, but you did not get a vote.
    This is a really simple thing.

    http://notrickszone.com/2017/05/23/reports-of-arctic-ice-death-have-been-greatly-exaggerated-greenland-ice-mass-near-record/comment-page-1/#comment-1211008

    “… the 30-year weather mean used to define climate

    Those 30-year means [or averages, and not necessarily the best measure to use] are defined as climate normals.

    The history of this is from the 1930s, before computers, when meteorologists meeting as the International Meteorological Organization (IMO) sought a reference for various comparisons.

    Climate, or climates, are better described by the Köppen-Geiger system that was initially established using ecotones, a transition area between two biomes. Thus, it used plants. Being time consuming and requiring much fieldwork, instruments soon replaced the better concept. Plants “integrate” the seasonal and longer term weather and allow for maps to show the patterns — climate zones.

    – See more at: http://notrickszone.com/2017/05/23/reports-of-arctic-ice-death-have-been-greatly-exaggerated-greenland-ice-mass-near-record/comment-page-1/#comment-1211008

  5. Nieuws 11.5.2020 - Leefbewust.com

    […] TikTok Over Children’s Data Early Insulin Initiation in Type 2 Diabetes Is Essential Earth’s Mean Temperature Falling, Planetary Alignment Suspected As Driver Of The 11-Year Solar Cyc… Emergency Field Hospitals STAND DOWN, Most Haven’t Seen A SINGLE Patient Erasmus University […]

  6. M E

    Climate zones using plants are useful for geographers and evidence of plant species excavated in archaeological sites is presumed to tell us the past local climate of that site. It is presumed because changes in water courses and streams can have a marked influence on which plants were growing at the time when the settlement or grave were made.

  7. RoHa

    Isn’t it man-made CO2 that causes the solar cycles?

  8. Luther

    This is old news. You should look at https://www.jupitersdance.com/

  9. Earth’s Mean Temperature Falling, Planetary Alignment Suspected As Driver Of The 11-Year Solar Cycle – Atlas Monitor

    […] No Tricks Zone | 9 May 2020 […]

  10. Government and Taxes: Climate Tricks 93, Solar cycle and another attack on Willie Soon

    […] Planetary Alignment Suspected As Driver Of The 11-Year Solar Cycle By P Gosselin on 9. May 2020 https://notrickszone.com/2020/05/09/earths-mean-temperature-falling-planetary-alignment-suspected-as… Prof. Fritz Vahrenholt’s Monthly Solar Report What causes the sun to have an 11-year […]

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  12. Earth's Mean Temperature Falling, Planetary Alignment Suspected As Driver Of The 11-Year Solar Cycle | Un hobby...

    […] F. Vahrenholt, May 9, 2020 in […]

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