Hamburg Germany Seeing MORE EASTER SNOW Than In 1960s (When CO2 Was Much Lower)

Share this...

Today we see SNOW in the forecast for Easter Monday across most of Germany

A few years ago, renowned warmist climate science professor Mojib Latif also chimed in, just after David Viner, in declaring snow and ice also would be a thing of the past in Germany.

The distinguished professor recalled growing up in Hamburg, and claimed “sometimes” seeing snow on Easter.

When I was a kid in the 1960s, we sometimes still had snow at Easter. In the meantime we have really forgotten how a winter really appears – and there can be winters also in times of global warming.”

In case Latif really has forgotten what winter looks like, he’s about to get a reminder  – tomorrow. In his comment above, Latif also used the word “sometimes” to describe the frequency of “having snow at Easter” in the 1960s, implying it occurred more than once.

Only one single Easter day in the 1960s

What follows are the Easter snow ON THE GROUND statistics in cm for Hamburg of the 1960s. To see if Latif was accurate, we look at the period from Holy Thursday through Easter Monday and the respective snowfall for each day. For example on March 30th, 1964 there was 3 cm of snow cover on the ground in Hamburg.

1960: 14-18 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1961: 30 March – 3 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1962: 19-23 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1963: 11-15 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1964: 26-30 March; 0, 0, 0, 0, 3
1965: 15-19 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1966: 7-11 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1967: 23-27 March; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1968: 11-15 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1969: 3-7 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0

Of the 50 days of Easter-time occurring in the 1960s, only one single day saw snow in Hamburg – a whole 3 cm on Easter Monday, March 30, 1964! Obviously personal memories are not reliable sources of data, especially in Prof. Latif’s case.

More snowy Easter days in the 2010s

How does this compare to our last decade, 2010-2019?

2010:  1-5 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
2011 21-25 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
2012: 5-9 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
2013: 28 Mar – 1 Apr; 5, 6, 4, 2, 0
2014: 17-21 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
2015: 2-6 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
2016: 27-31 March; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
2017: 13-17 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
2018: 29 Mar – 2 Apr; 6, 0, 0, 0, 0
2019: 18-22 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0

From 2010 to 2019, Hamburg saw snow on the ground on 5 days, i.e. more often than in the 1960s.

Another Easter snow day forecast for Hamburg

The current decade looks as follows:

2020: 9-13 April; 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
2021: 0, 0, 0, 0, but with snow forecast tomorrow in Hamburg.

Snow forecast to sweep across Hamburg and much of Germany on Easter Monday. Image: wetteronline.de

That would make Easter in Hamburg seeing snow on the ground on 6 days over the past 10 years, compared to just once in the 1960s. Snow has become more frequent over the past decades, and not less frequent.

But then again it should not be a surprise snow is appearing a bit more frequently in Hamburg at Easter. Just a few days ago we wrote how spring was tending to arrive later in Hamburg, and not sooner like global warming alarmists like to have everyone think it is.




Share this...

5 responses to “Hamburg Germany Seeing MORE EASTER SNOW Than In 1960s (When CO2 Was Much Lower)”

  1. tygrus

    Using “Easter” as a reference is inconsistent. A narrow 5 day window that moves around is not scientifically useful for analysis especially not for climate.

    Pick the same 4 week period for each year eg. from 18th March to 14th April inclusive. Then look at the snow trend over the years/decades.

  2. RoHa

    See! Climate change. This snow proves the world is getting dangerously hot.

  3. drumphish

    How can anyone be so foolish as to predict the end of snow? Like they’re in control. Probably not.

    You would have to remove all of the water on the planet to see the end of snow.

    You’ll see some serious global climate change then.

    I won’t hold my breath or stand on one leg.

    Let it snow!

  4. Hamburg Germany Seeing MORE Easter Snow Than In 1960s | altnews.org

    […] Read more at No Tricks Zone […]

  5. The Atmosphere Guy

    What we are seeing, Europe-wise, at the moment is a classic display of the “Deep Loop” phenomenon.
    With the upper atmosphere exceptionally cold, as it is at present, contraction of the atmospheric structure allows the “Sea-Land” differential to become the dominant influence forming the looped pattern in the jet stream,and allowing surface patterns to pull up tropical air and pull down polar masses alternately. Some observations here :

    https://howtheatmosphereworks.wordpress.com/observations-2021/

Leave a Reply

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this. More information at our Data Privacy Policy

Close